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Kings Mountain State Park

Kings Mountain State Park is a nearly 7000-acre state park in York County near the North Carolina state line and is about 40 miles from Charlotte.  The state park is adjacent to Kings Mountain National Military Park and is connected to Crowders Mountain State Park in North Carolina via the Ridgeline Trail.  The park was established in 1934 and most of the facilities were built by the Civilian Conservation Corps.  The park has many camping options including a developed campground for tents or RVs, primitive group campsites, and equestrian camping.  There are more than 20 miles of hiking trails and more than 30 miles of equestrian trails.  Additionally, there is a Living History Farm with reconstructed buildings typical of 19th century Piedmont farming and some farm animals.  Admission to the park is $2 per person.

Contact Information:

1277 Park Road
Blacksburg, SC 29702

Phone (803) 222-3209

Directions:

From I-85, take exit 2 in North Carolina signed for Kings Mountain National Military Park.  Go south on NC-216, which becomes SC-216 in about a mile.  Continue on SC-216 for another 3 miles, passing through Kings Mountain National Military Park to enter the state park.

Map:

Hiking:

Kings Mountain Trail:

Kings Mountain Trail is a blue-blazed, 16-mile loop trail that leads between Kings Mountain National Military Park and Kings Mountain State Park.  It is a designated National Recreation Trail.  To access the trail from the State Park, the trailhead is at the entrance to the campground.  It's a loop so can be hiked in either direction.

Living History Farm:

The Living History Farm is located off Camp Cherokee Road just past the park office.  The farm is a replica of an 19th century South Carolina yeoman farm.  The farm includes a barn, farm house, cotton gin, blacksmith shop and an outhouse.


In addition to the historic buildings, several heirloom crops are grown and a number of farm animals live here, including chickens, horses and a donkey.

Wildlife:

Carolina horsenettle (Solanum carolinense) is a species of nightshade.  Like many in the family, it is very poisonous.


The luna moth (Actias luna) is a beautiful species of moth with green wings and distinct eye spots.  The adult moth does not have a mouth, because it does not live long enough to eat!


Black rat snakes (Pantherophis obsoletus) live in the forest and feed on rodents.  They are not venomous and kill prey by constriction.


Box Turtle (Terrapene carolina)

Blog Entries:

27-May-2018: Kings Mountain Trail

26-May-2018: Flooded Lilies

External Links: